Curriculum Provision at XII Apostles

Organisation

This is a one formed entry primary school which means that there is one class in each year group with one teacher and a teaching assistant. The children are organised into classes according to their age. There are 7 classes as follows: Reception, Y1, Y2, Y3, Y4, Y5 and Y6. Each class teacher in consultation with the Headteacher is responsible for organising and delivering all the subjects of the National Curriculum and Religious Education for the children in their class.

Whenever it is possible, class teachers can call on support from other teachers with specific expertise in such subjects as French, Information Technology, P.E., Music or R.E.

Our Curriculum Intent

Our Mission: Through learning and loving we will follow Jesus

Our Intent

  • For our children to fulfil their unique human potential, follow the Gospel values and place Christ at the centre of everything they do

Implementation

At XII Apostles our outstanding curriculum is designed to fulfil the aims of our mission statement. As a Catholic Primary School, the gospel values are interwoven into the curriculum and all aspects of school life. We believe that our individual pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is at the heart of their overall education and their ability to learn and achieve. We therefore aim to provide all pupils with positive, rewarding experiences through a planned and coherent curriculum that is founded upon our Christian values.

Our Intent

  • For our children to receive the very best education by providing a broad and balanced, engaging and interesting curriculum, ensuring they develop the necessary skills in reading, writing and mathematics thus enabling them to fulfil their human potential in all curriculum areas.

Implementation

We follow the aims of the national curriculum;

The national curriculum provides pupils with an introduction to the essential knowledge they need to be educated citizens. It introduces pupils to the best that has been thought and said, and helps engender an appreciation of human creativity and achievement.

The national curriculum is just one element in the education of every child. There is time and space in the school day and in each week, term and year to range beyond the national curriculum specifications. The national curriculum provides an outline of core knowledge around which teachers can develop exciting and stimulating lessons to promote the development of pupils’ knowledge, understanding and skills as part of the wider school curriculum.

However, our curriculum is tailored to meet the needs of our children using a cross curricular approach, were appropriate. Our curriculum is carefully planned and sequenced to allow the development and progression of skills and the acquisition of knowledge in meaningful and relevant contexts. Subject leader’s long term plans detail the development of skills in each subject area.

Our Intent

  • For our children to be aspirational and have high expectations of themselves, and to be ambitious for their future.

Implementation

We strive to ensure our children have access to rich and varied life experiences in which they will have the motivation and confidence to go out into the wider world and fulfil their human potential. We challenge and overcome low aspirations and poverty of ambition. There is a strong emphasis on using the curriculum to develop behaviours through learning powers that would serve pupils well as they progress to the next stage of their learning and the world of work. Furthermore, we also endeavor to develop our children’s attitudes and mind sets towards the challenges they face within their learning. This is achieved through the idea of learning ‘powers’. We encourage our children to focus on themselves as learners, and to realise that they can learn to be good at learning. The idea of every child having learning powers enables skills such as resourcefulness, resilience, collaboration and independence to be explored, developed and applied. We believe that developing these powers will equip our children with the ability to keep going when problems arise as well as be able to think about how they can achieve a goal and solve problems effectively. Eventually, our children will be able to transfer and develop their powers into life skills and feel confident as they face new and different situations in school and their lives beyond.

Our Intent

  • For our children to have a sound understanding of their heritage and have open hearts and minds to the diversity in their immediate community and the world beyond.

Implementation

In addition to the National Curriculum each year group studies an element of local History and Geography. Our curriculum reflects the rich history and geography that our local area holds. Children are encouraged to consider the role they play and how they can make positive contributions to the local community. Trips and visitors are organised so that the children can develop a deeper understanding as to how our local area has changed.

Our Intent

  • For our children to be healthy in body and in mind. To give children, who would otherwise not, the opportunity to participate in a range of sports and healthy activities.

Implementation

We have a full, rich and varied sports curriculum which is enhanced by extra-curricular clubs and activities. All children participate in sport and enjoy all it has to offer without any cost to families. We encourage the children to learn, through sport, how to win graciously, lose with courage and never give up. Opportunities throughout the whole curriculum are used to ensure the children develop a healthy image of themselves as individuals and to recognise the unique beauty in each and every individual as they were created by God. Our focus on learning powers gives children knowledge and skills to grow up to be resilient, responsible, confident and independent.

Our Intent

  • For our children to appreciate experience and engage with all forms the arts. For children to develop the skills within music and art to enable them to access a world of possibilities that music and art can offer them both now and later in their lives.

Implementation

The Art, Design and Music National curriculum is enriched through a range of visits and visors to school. The children have the opportunity to visit Art Galleries work with artist in residence and also attend an Art residential. They all study different Artists and their work. Musical experiences include, visits to the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester to listen to the Halle Orchestra. We have close links with Wigan Music services who provide induvial tuition in a range of instruments. Through Wigan services the children have the opportunity to listen to various musical ensembles perform including, jazz and brass. All children in KS2 have the opportunity to join the school choir and take part in regional events like lets sing and young voices. They have many opportunities to perform for audiences throughout the year.

Please go to the class pages to view each year groups termly curriculum overview.

Religious Education

Religious Education- Subject Leader Mrs Featherstone

Religious Education is the core subject at our school: the gospel values of love, care and mutual respect underpin every aspect of school life. Religious Education is taught discreetly through the programme recommended by the Archdiocese called, ’Come and See.’

In addition to the R.E. lessons, the children take part in a Collective Worship session every day. This is where we give the children and staff opportunities to come together to worship God.

The Liturgical Prayer Group is a group of seven children from Year 5 and 6. These children also plan and deliver Collective Worship sessions for individual classes and for the whole school during special times.

The children also attend three whole school assemblies weekly and Mass at various times during the Liturgical year. For further information please go to the home page and click on the heading Religion.

The programme: Come and See

Term Topics to be Covered in all year groups
Autumn Family, Another faith week - Judaism, Belonging, Loving
Spring Community, Relating, Giving
Summer Serving, Inter-relating, Another faith week, World
The children getting involved in RE activites
English including Speaking and Listening

English - Subject Leader Mrs C. Marsden

English Curriculum Intent

"Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun." – Mary Lou Cook.

The overarching aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written language, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. The national curriculum for English aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • Develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • Appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • Write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • Use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • Are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate

At XII Apostles, we strive for our children to receive the very best education by providing an exciting, broad, balanced, engaging and creative English curriculum, ensuring they develop the necessary skills in reading and writing thus enabling them to fulfil their human potential in all curriculum areas.

We ensure and provide opportunities our children to practise, develop, explore and utilise their skills for real and meaningful purposes across the whole curriculum in order to express themselves effectively, develop confidence and identity and thus contribute positively to the world around them.

English Curriculum Implementation

English is a core subject and is taught daily. However, it is interwoven throughout the whole curriculum and plays an integral part in our cross curricular approach. Opportunities for practise and development of skills and knowledge are developed and built upon so that our children experience and appreciate the value of English to them now, and in their futures, through many different vehicles and in many different contexts.

English Impact

Our mission is clear: we aim to ensure that all children fulfil their human potential. We have a supportive ethos and our approach supports the children in developing their collaborative and independent skills, as well as empathy and the need to recognise the achievement of others. Children can underperform in English because of a lack of aspiration or a fixed mind set towards their own potential. The principles behind incorporating and interweaving all elements of English throughout the writing progress, especially speaking and listening, ensures that all children experience challenge and success in English. Regular, meaningful and engaging practise, development and application of skills throughout all areas of the curriculum and for differing purposes, ensures children have the opportunity to communicate and express themselves. Through the development of their own ‘voice’, subsequent opportunities to further develop their self-belief and other characteristics of a growth mind set are utilised. Regular and ongoing assessment informs teaching, as well as intervention, to support and enable the success of each child. These factors ensure that we are able to maintain high standards, with progress by the end of KS2 being well above the national average.

Writing Intent

Speaking and Listening Skills

Reading Intent

English Long Term Plan.

Reading LTP and Progression Mapping.

Policies

Reading Policy

Spelling Policy

Handwriting Policy

Writing Policy

Picture of the children learning Literacy Picture of the children learning Literacy 2017
Mathematics

Maths - Subject Leader: Mrs Whitton

Maths Curriculum Intent

The 2014 National Curriculum for Maths aims to ensure that all children:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics
  • Are able to reason mathematically
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics

At Twelve Apostles, these skills are embedded within Maths lessons and developed consistently over time. We are committed to ensuring that children are able to recognise the importance of Maths in the wider world and that they are also able to use their mathematical skills and knowledge confidently in their lives in a range of different contexts. We want all children to enjoy Mathematics and to experience success in the subject, with the ability to reason mathematically. We are committed to developing children’s curiosity about the subject, as well as an appreciation of the beauty and power of Mathematics.

Picture of the children learning Numeracy

Implementation

The content and principles underpinning the 2014 Mathematics curriculum and the Maths curriculum at Twelve Apostles ensures that children develop a deep, conceptual understanding of mathematical concepts. These principles and features steer the way in which our curriculum is implemented:

  • Teachers reinforce an expectation that all children are capable of achieving high standards in Mathematics.
  • The large majority of children progress through the curriculum content at the same pace and aim towards their year group expectations.
  • New concepts are introduced through concrete, pictorial and symbolic representations. Children progress through these stages at their own pace and the appropriate models and images are provided to support learning.
  • Learning is supported by carefully planned and sequenced lessons and specifically chosen resources to enable a deep conceptual and procedural knowledge.
  • Teachers use the White Rose scheme of learning to support in planning the maths curriculum.
  • There is a clear progression to written calculation policy and mental strategies progression chart that ensures progression year on year.
  • The NCETM materials are also used to support staff subject knowledge.
  • Differentiation is achieved through identifying those children who need to spend more time at each of the above stages.
  • Practice and consolidation play a central role. Children are given the opportunity to practice skills within a variety of contexts so that they develop a strong varied fluency.
  • Play and practical exploration are key to developing a conceptual understanding in maths and in engaging children in enjoyment of maths.
  • Problem solving activities are interwoven into the teaching of mathematics to ensure children have a wealth of opportunities to apply their knowledge, understanding and skills.
  • Maths vocabulary is key to enabling children to mathematically reason and problem solve. Key vocabulary is explicitly taught so that children have the building blocks to reason.
  • Children are taught to use models and images to explore and explain or reason mathematical concepts.
  • Teachers use assessment for learning throughout the teaching cycle to identify conceptual and procedural knowledge. This assessment information is used to inform teaching and identify quickly those children who require intervention.
  • Children who fall significantly behind in maths are identified and supported through the ‘Maths Recovery’ intervention programme.
  • Children with SEN in maths are supported using the same principles of concrete, pictorial and symbolic. They have individual or small group sessions that are planned for using B squared- small step objectives.

Impact

Our mission is clear, we aim to ensure that all children fulfil their human potential. We have a supportive ethos and our approaches support the children in developing their collaborative and independent skills, as well as empathy and the need to recognise the achievement of others. Children can underperform in Mathematics because they think they can’t do it or are not naturally good at it. The principles behind using concrete, pictorial and symbolic representations to support children enables all children to achieve. It ensures that all children experience challenge and success in Mathematics by developing a growth mindset. Regular and ongoing assessment informs teaching, as well as intervention, to support and enable the success of each child. These factors ensure that we are able to maintain high standards, with achievement at the end of KS2 above the national average and a high proportion of children demonstrating greater depth.

Mathematics Policy.

Progression to Written Calculation Policy.

Progression Chart for Mental Calculations.

Mathematics Long Term Plan.

Science

Science - Subject Leaders Mrs Whitton and Miss Phoenix

Mission Statement

Our Mission: Through learning and loving we will follow Jesus

Our aims:

To place Christ at the centre of everything we do

To recognise that each child is unique and to ensure that each child is educated to fulfil their human potential

To develop an understanding of Community; being able to recognise, respect and celebrate the diversity of all within it.

Science Intent

“The important thing is to never stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein.

The National Curriculum outlines the following aims for science in primary schools:

  • To develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • To develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • To ensure all children are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future

In the National Curriculum, science is broken down into two parts; scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding and the nature, processes and methods of science. We aim to use a wide range of contexts to maximise pupil's engagement and motivation in science so that children make progress in each of these strands.

At Twelve Apostles, our aim is to provide children with a broad and balanced, engaging and interesting science curriculum that ensures children are given the opportunity to fulfil their human potential as scientists.

Our Science curriculum intends to celebrate and recognise that each child is unique and to encourage children to be aspirational, have high expectations of themselves and to be ambitious for their future.

We want to develop children’s scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through giving them the opportunities to be biologists, chemists and physicians during their science lessons. We look to equip children with the scientific knowledge and enquiry skills to help them answer questions about the world in preparation for the implication of science today and for the future. We are committed to developing children’s curiosity about the subject, as well as an appreciation of the possibilities and power of science in the world around them.

Over the years, children develop many scientific enquiry skills:

In KS1, children are taught to use practical scientific methods, processes and skills to ensure they can ask simple questions and recognise that these questions can be answered in different ways. They should be shown how to observe closely, using simple equipment through practical experiences when performing simple tests. Over the two years, children will be taught how to identify and classify and will gather and record data using tables to help answer questions that are presented to them.

In lower KS2, children are taught to use practical scientific methods, processes and skills to ensure they can ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquiries to answer them. Children will begin to plan for practical enquiries and comparative and fair tests, from which they will make systematic and careful observations, taking accurate measurements, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers. Children draw upon their mathematics and English skills in a variety of ways through given opportunities to gather, record, classify and present data using bar charts, graphs and tables and when writing explanations, results and conclusions.

In upper KS2, children are taught to use practical scientific methods, processes and skills to ensure they can plan different types of scientific enquires that answer their own questions. Children should begin to recognise and control variables and use equipment to take measurements with increasing accuracy and precision, including the use of repeat readings. When recording data and results, children are introduced to more complex methods of presenting data, including labelled diagrams, scatter graphs and classification keys to highlight causal relations. Over the two years, children will develop their skills when identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas of arguments.

Science Implementation.

The content and principles underpinning the National Curriculum for science and the science curriculum at Twelve Apostles ensures that children develop a strong, conceptual understanding of scientific subject knowledge and scientific enquiry skills.

  • Teachers reinforce an expectation that all children are capable of achieving high standards in science.
  • The large majority of children progress through the curriculum content at the same pace and aim towards their year group expectations.
  • Learning is supported by carefully planned and sequenced lessons and specifically chosen resources to enable a deep conceptual and procedural knowledge.
  • Each science topic begins with a big question to stimulate children’s curiosity and maximise pupil’s engagement in their learning. They are given the opportunity to explore and research famous scientists and look at their role in the history of science.
  • Scientific vocabulary is key to enabling children to be scientists and investigate. Key vocabulary is planned for and explicitly taught so that children have the building blocks to explain their understanding.
  • Play and practical exploration are key to developing a conceptual understanding in science and in engaging children in enjoyment of science.
  • Progression of subject knowledge and skills is carefully monitored from session to session and year group to year group to ensure children achieve their full scientific potential.
  • Teachers are given the freedom to find and use resources to plan for and teach exciting and stimulating science lessons for children.
  • The local community is used as a stimulus for scientific exploration. The environment surrounding the school is utilised by teachers to enable the children to investigate and observe the wonders of the world. For example, seasonal changes and animals and their habitats.
  • Teachers use assessment for learning throughout the teaching cycle to identify conceptual and procedural knowledge. This assessment information is used to inform teaching and identify quickly those children who require additional support.
  • Summative assessments are carried out at the end of each unit and children are assessed on both scientific subject knowledge as well as working scientifically skills.
  • Through Science, children will draw upon their cross curricular skills such as reading and writing, computing skills as well as many mathematics skills such as data collection, analysis and presentation of results using tables and graphs.
  • Children with SEND are supported through differentiation of resources, support and adapted work.
  • Periodically, KS2 are offered an extracurricular science club, where they are given the opportunity to take part in exciting and engaging science activities linked to the National Curriculum.

Science Impact

Our mission is clear, we aim to ensure that all children fulfil their human potential. We have a supportive ethos and our approaches support the children in developing their collaborative and independent skills, as well as empathy and the need to recognise the achievement of others.

Children can underperform in science because they think they cannot do it or are not naturally good at it. The principles behind using play and practical experience enables all children to achieve. It ensures that all children experience challenge and success in science by developing a growth mindset. Regular and ongoing assessment informs teaching to support and enable the success of each child. These factors ensure that we are able to maintain high standards, with achievement at the end of KS2.

Science Policy.

Working Scientifically progression mapping.

Science subject knowledge progression mapping.

Science Long Term Plan.

Picture of the children learning Science
Computing

Subject Leader - Mrs A Yates
Mission Statement

At Twelve Apostles, the Mission Statement declares that we aim to provide a caring and safe place to learn and all children are given every chance to learn more about things we are good at, and the things we want to learn more about. Computing is an exciting and interesting way for the children to celebrate and practise the skills they are good at and allow them to learn more.

Intent:

The National Curriculum for Computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Computer Science-This aspect of the curriculum allows the children to find out how computers and computer systems work. They can then apply this knowledge through programming. Computer science is taught throughout the school at an age appropriate level.
  • Digital Literacy-Becoming digitally literate enables the children to become safe users of technology. We teach the children the value of technology, how to use computers safely and how to evaluate online content.
  • Information Technology-The teaching of information technology gives the children the ability to create, edit, analyse, save and retrieve purposeful digital content including text, data and pictures. The children are able to use a variety of software and effectively use search technologies. They are also able to apply their learning in other areas of the curriculum.

At some point in units of work the children are taught how the skills, knowledge or use of hardware/software is used in everyday life. This may be done through sharing examples or evaluating how effective it is to use a computer-based device. Problem solving activities are taught alongside computing to enhance the children’s computational thinking. Subject-specific vocabulary is used in lessons by the teacher and children.

In school, the curriculum is taught using a range of hardware and software. This includes:

  • A bank of laptops in both key stages
  • A bank of iPads
  • Hardware to teach control units such as, Beebots, Roamer and Lego WeDo
  • Data Loggers
  • Subscription to Purple Mash for all year groups
  • An editable live website for the Year 6 children to design and code throughout the year

We recognise that the children’s skill level and knowledge varies therefore we provide suitable experiences and tasks for all children by:

  • Setting open-ended tasks where the outcome can vary
  • Supporting the children through working with an adult
  • Grouping the children by ability group and differentiating the tasks
  • Challenging children to extend their learning and skills
  • Giving the children the opportunity to practise the skills they have learned in their computing lessons in other contexts
  • Providing the children with resources to support them
  • Organising children in such a way that they receive support from their peers

Teachers use a range of resources to support them with their planning and teaching of the curriculum. This includes schemes of work from Smithills ICT, Purple Mash and Twinkl. The Year 6 unit of work on creating a website was written in collaboration with the company that hosts our school website, Cre8.

The Computing long term plan is taught discretely or through cross-curricular work. Skills are applied in other areas of the curriculum.

The curriculum has been enhanced by after school clubs and out of school visits.

Impact:

At XII Apostles, we recognise the unique needs of each child and support them in reaching their human potential. The impact of our Computing curriculum is measured in the competence and knowledge of our children within the subject and the confidence to apply the skills they have been taught, in other subjects and within the wider world. Also, the children know how to be respectful and responsible users of technology who keep themselves safe. Progression of skills is evident in the children’s work and through pupil interviews were the children are using subject specific vocabulary.

Picture of the children learning Computing

The children are taught word processing skills throughout their school life and apply their skills in other subjects.

Picture of the children learning Computing

The children are given the opportunity to do some programming in each year group.

Picture of the children learning Computing

The children use tablets regularly for programming, research and accessing educational apps.

Picture of the children learning Computing

The SMART letters are displayed in school to remind children of the online safety rules they are taught to follow. These were made by the children during Safer Internet Week and they are decorated with pieces of computer hardware.



Computing Long Term Plan and Progress of Skills in Computing.

Physical Education

Physical Education; Subject Leader Miss S. Hope

Intent

We aim to deliver high-quality teaching and learning opportunities that enables all children to achieve their personal best. We aim for all children to be physically active for sustained periods and be able to make informed decisions to lead healthy and active lives. We aim to give children, who would not otherwise, the opportunity to participate in a range of sports and healthy activities and become physically confident in a way, which supports their health and fitness now and for their future. We aim for children to be aspirational and have high expectations of themselves, and to be ambitious for their sporting future.

Through our School Sports Values, we encourage our children to learn, through sport, how to win graciously, lose with courage and never give up. Opportunities throughout the whole curriculum are used to ensure the children develop a healthy image of themselves as individuals and to recognise the unique beauty in each individual as God created them.

Swimming is an important life skill; we aspire for all children to leave primary school being able to swim at least 25 metres.

Implementation

  • We have a full, rich and varied curriculum, which is enhanced by extra-curricular clubs and activities that are inclusive, enjoyable and increase children’s physical activity.
  • Children participate in high-quality PE lessons with the majority being delivered by a specialist sports coach/teacher.
  • All classes follow the PE overview to ensure children participate in a variety of sports and there is a progression of skills.
  • Children participate in a variety of competitive sports. Children attend sports festivals for Key Stage 1 and 2 and participate in Change4Life festival.
  • All classes participate in the Daily Mile to help children to meet the 30 minutes of physical activity at school.
  • We track the non-participants each term and offer these children additional opportunities during lunchtime clubs.
  • Children attend swimming lessons in Years 3, 5, and those that need additional lessons in Year 6.
  • Our whole-school Sports day includes lots of intra-school competition.
  • All children participate in sport and enjoy all it has to offer without any costs to families.

Impact

Our pupils are physically active and this has positive implications on their learning in the classroom. All children are provided with the skills and given opportunities to demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best. Children understand how to lead a healthy lifestyle and understand the importance of exercise. All children enjoy PE lessons and develop a love of sport, and physical activity, they pursue sport outside of school and in future life outside of primary school. All pupils understand the values and importance of fair play and being a good sportsperson. All pupils leave school with the skills to self-rescue in the water and swim 25 metres competently.

Picture of the our Highland Games gold medals Physical Education


Picture of the children learning Physical Education


Picture of the children learning Physical Education 1 Picture of the children learning Physical Education 2

Picture of the children learning Physical Education 3 Picture of the children learning Physical Education 4

Picture of the children learning Physical Education 5 Picture of the children learning Physical Education 6

Physical Education Long Term Plan.

Physical Education Policy.

History

History Subject Leader: Mrs D Parry

Mission Statement

To place Christ at the centre of everything we do.To recognise that each child is unique and to ensure that each child is educated to fulfil their human potential.To develop an understanding of community; being able to recognise, respect and celebrate the diversity of all within it.

Our school’s Mission Statement provides us with values, beliefs and relationships and is the basis for everything we do, underpinning the purpose of all our work in Twelve Apostles

Intent

The national curriculum outlines the following aims for History in schools:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern 33how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political,religious and social history; and between short-and long-term timescales.

At Twelve Apostles,our aim is for children to develop a sound understanding of their local and national heritageand toprovide children with the opportunity to investigate the past through a wide range of experiences. We are committed to developing children’s curiosity about local, national and international history by broadening their knowledge of people, events and places in the past. Our curriculum is driven through the following historical concepts (similarities and differences; significance; continuity andchange; movement of people; cause and effect; concurrence)which are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our curriculum is arranged so that pupils return to thesesame conceptsrepeatedly, gradually building an understanding of them.Our Long term plan details how pupils will be given opportunities to relate topics to previously studied topics to deepen understanding.

Implementation

History teaching focuses on enabling children to think as historians. Our principal aim is to develop the children’s knowledge, skills and understanding in history. We believe that children learn best when:

  • They have access to, and are able to handle artefacts.
  • They go on visits to sites of historical significance and places of interest.
  • They have access to secondary sources such asbooks and photographs.
  • They can talk to visitors/family members about their personal experience of the past.
  • They listen to and interact with stories from the past.
  • They are shown, or use independently, resources from the internet and videos.
  • Theyare able to use non-fiction books for research.
  • They are provided with opportunities to work independently or collaboratively, to ask as well as answer historical questions.
  • They are given time to reflect on their own learning by giving them opportunities to create visual prompts enabling them to recall how they learned about this period, thus creating opportunities to identify links and relate periods of history together.

We recognise that we have children of differing abilities in History and we seek to provide suitable learning opportunities by matching the challenge of the task to the child’s ability. We achieve this by:

  • Setting open-ended tasks which can have a variety of responses.
  • Grouping children by ability and setting different tasks for each ability group.
  • Providing resources of different complexity depending on the ability of the child.
  • Using Teaching Assistants to support children individually or in groups.
  • Organising children in such a way that they receive support from their peers.

In addition to the National Curriculum each year group studies an element of local History. Our curriculum reflects the rich history that our local area holds. Children are encouraged to consider the role they play and how they can make positive contributions to the local community. Trips and visitors are organised so that the children can develop a deeper understanding as to how our local area has changed.

Impact

At XII Apostles, we recognise the unique needs of each child and support them in reaching their human potential. We have a supportive ethos and our approaches support the children in developing their collaborative and independent skills, as well as empathy and the need to recognise the achievement of others. The impact of our History curriculum is measured in the experiences, confidence and competence of our children within the subject. We ensure children receive the experiences they require, both within and beyond the curriculum, to develop their skills and knowledge and become confident historians. By revisiting historical concepts, children will deepen their understanding and be able to identify links and be able to relate periods of history together. Progress in History throughout Twelve apostles is outstanding.Children typically enter school at below the expected level on the ELG ‘Knowledge and Understanding of the World, but the average percentage of children for the past3 years achieving Secure or above,at the end of Year 6 is 90%.

Picture of the children learning History 1

The children visited Chester and pretended to be Roman Soldiers.

Picture of the children learning History 1

The children visited Tatton Park to learn about how children’s lives were different in the past.

Picture of the children learning History 1

Year 4 really enjoyed being Anglo-Saxon soldiers during a recent workshop in school.

History Long Term Plan.

Geography

Geography - Subject Leader: Mrs Parry

Mission Statement

To place Christ at the centre of everything we do.

To recognise that each child is unique and to ensure that each child is educated to fulfil their human potential.

To develop an understanding of community; being able to recognise, respect and celebrate the diversity of all within it.

Our school’s Mission Statement provides us with values, beliefs and relationships and is the basis for everything we do, underpinning the purpose of all our work in Twelve Apostles.

Intent

The national curriculum outlines the following aims for Geography in schools:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
    1. collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
    2. interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
    3. communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

At Twelve Apostles, our aim is for children to develop a sound understanding of the world in which we live. We want children to explore, appreciate and understand how the world has evolved. Geography explores the relationship between the world and its people through the study of place and environment. Through Geography, children acquire knowledge of a range of different cultures and traditions, which helps them to learn tolerance and understanding of other people and environments. In this way, Geography contributes to children’s cultural, social, spiritual and moral development.

We are committed to developing children’s curiosity about local, national and international localities by broadening their knowledge of people, places and environments across the world. Our curriculum is driven through the following geographical concepts (Investigating places; Investigating patterns and Communicating geographically) which are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our curriculum is arranged so that pupils return to these same concepts repeatedly, gradually building an understanding of them. Our Long-term plan details how pupils will be given opportunities to relate topics to previously studied topics to deepen understanding.

Implementation

Geography teaching focuses on enabling children to think as geographers. Our principal aim is to develop the children’s knowledge, skills and understanding in Geography and we use a variety of teaching and learning styles throughout Geography lessons. We believe that children learn best when:

  • They have access to enquiry-based research activities.
  • They go on visits to sites of geographical significance and places of interest.
  • They have access to a variety of data such as maps, statistics, graphs, pictures and aerial photographs.
  • They are shown, or use independently, resources from the internet and videos.
  • They can use ICT in geography lessons where appropriate, including the production of digital maps. (use of Digi-Maps)
  • They are able to use non-fiction books for research.
  • They are provided with opportunities to work independently or collaboratively, to ask as well as answer geographical questions.
  • They engage in a variety of problem-solving activities.
  • They are given time to reflect on their own learning by giving them opportunities to create visual prompts enabling them to recall how they learned about this place/enironment, thus creating opportunities to identify links and relate places and environments to each other.

We recognise that we have children of differing abilities in Geography and we seek to provide suitable learning opportunities by matching the challenge of the task to the child’s ability. We achieve this by:

  • Setting open-ended tasks which can have a variety of responses.
  • Grouping children by ability and setting different tasks for each ability group.
  • Providing resources of different complexity depending on the ability of the child.
  • Using Teaching Assistants to support children individually or in groups.
  • Organising children in such a way that they receive support from their peers.

In addition to the National Curriculum each year group studies an element of local Geography. Our curriculum reflects the vast geographical changes that have shaped our local area both now and in the past. Children are encouraged to consider the role they play and how they can make positive contributions to the local community. Trips and visitors are organised so that the children can develop a deeper understanding as to how our local area has changed.

Impact

At XII Apostles, we recognise the unique needs of each child and support them in reaching their human potential. We have a supportive ethos and our approaches support the children in developing their collaborative and independent skills, as well as empathy and the need to recognise the achievement of others. The impact of our Geography curriculum is measured in the experiences, confidence and competence of our children within the subject. We ensure children receive the experiences they require, both within and beyond the curriculum, to develop their skills and knowledge and become confident geographers.

By revisiting geographical concepts, children will deepen their understanding and be able to identify links between their own immediate environments and places around the world and the interactions between the physical and human environment. These studies will help children to recognise the importance of sustainable development for the future of mankind and how they can contribute towards it. Progress in Geography throughout Twelve Apostles is outstanding. Children typically enter school at below the expected level on the ELG ‘Knowledge and Understanding of the World’ and ‘People and Communities’, but the average percentage of children for the past 3 years achieving Secure or above, at the end of Year 6 is 90%.

Picture of the children learning Geography 1

Reception Class visited Formby to look at how Formby is different to Leigh.

Picture of the children learning Geography 2

During their lakes and mountains topic, the children visited the Lake District and took part in orienteering and shelter building activities.

Picture of the children learning Geography 3

During their local area study, Year 5 undertook surveys of features of the local environment. E.g. houses.

Geography Long Term Plan.

Geography Policy.

Design and Technology

Design Technology

Intent Statement

“I think one of the big challenges is actually cultivating beginners’ minds and making sure you’re still open to the world and continue to see new things… Those are the things an entrepreneur needs—an open mind and the ability to see the world with new eyes.”- Caterina Fake: an American entrepreneur and businesswoman who co-founded the websites Flickr and Hunch.

At Twelve Apostles, our vision for Design Technology is just that: cultivating beginner’s minds. DT should provide children with a real life context for learning. inspired by engineers, designers, chefs and architects to enable them to create a range of structures, mechanisms, textiles, electrical systems and food products with a real life purpose.

Curriculum Implementation

The teaching of Design Technology across the school follows the National Curriculum. It is cross - curricular and draws upon subject knowledge and skills within Mathematics, Science, History, Computing and Art. Teachers use some ideas from the Design and Technology Association's 'Projects On A Page' documents and Nuffield Primary Design and Technology | STEM web site

Children design products with a purpose in mind and an intended user of the products. Food technology is implemented across the school with children developing an understanding of where food comes from, the importance of a varied and healthy diet and how to prepare this.

Design and Technology also embeds Twelve Apostles Learning Powers. It is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject, requiring curiosity, creativity, collaborative working, resourcefulness, and imagination. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. Children learn to take risks, be reflective, innovative, enterprising and resilient. Through the evaluation of past and present technology they can reflect upon the impact of Design Technology on everyday life and the wider world.

All teaching of DT should follow the design, make and evaluate cycle. Each stage should be rooted in technical knowledge. The design process should be rooted in real life, relevant contexts to give meaning to learning. While making, children should be given choice and a range of tools to choose freely from. To evaluate, children should be able to evaluate their own products against a design criteria.

Early Years Foundation Stage

Design Technology starts in the EYFS. children are supported in the development of skills, knowledge and understanding that help them make sense of the world. We relate the development of the children’s knowledge and understanding of the world to the objectives set out in The Early Years Foundation Stage curriculum and the Early Learning Goals.

The KS1 Design Technology curriculum looks like:

Design:

  • Design should be rooted in real life, relevant contexts to give meaning to the learning.
  • Planned through appropriate formats: drawing, templates, talking and mock-ups.

Make:

  • Evaluate existing products.
  • Children should use a wide range of materials and components; textiles, construction equipment and ingredients.

Evaluate

  • Children should be given a range of tools for their projects to choose from.
  • Evaluate their own products against design criteria.

The KS2 Design Technology curriculum looks like:

Design:

  • Rooted in real life, relevant contexts to give meaning to the learning.
  • Researched designs based on functional, appealing products with purpose.
  • Planned by appropriate methods; annotated sketches, cross-sectional diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer aided design.

Make:

  • Children can select from a wider range of tools than KS1.
  • Children should use from and select a wider range of materials and components; textiles, construction equipment and ingredients.

Evaluate

  • Evaluations should be in comparison to existing products.
  • Children should evaluate against a design criteria.
  • Children should understand how key events and individuals have helped shape design and technology globally – products are in context!

Curriculum Impact

Assessment of children's learning in Design Technology is an ongoing monitoring of children's understanding, knowledge and skills by the class teacher, throughout lessons. This assessment is then used to inform differentiation, support and challenge required by the children.

Summative assessments are completed at the end of the school year by class teachers across each year group of the school to inform the subject leader of progress or skills and knowledge still to be embedded. This is recorded and passed on to the next teacher and subject leader.

Design Technology is also monitored by the subject leader throughout the year in the form of book monitoring, looking at outcomes and pupil interviews to discuss their learning and understanding and establish the impact of the teaching taking place.

Picture of the children learning Design and Technology

As part of the Las Vegas fund raising afternoon, Year 6 children designed, made and evaluated games which were suitable for different age ranges throughout school.

Design and Technology Long Term Plan.

Art and Design

Art and Design; Subject Leader Mr Rowlands

Intent:

The national curriculum for Art and Design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Our Art and Design curriculum intends to celebrate and recognise that each child is unique and encourage them to reach their full potential as artists. We look to help children become skilled, confident and creative artists. Alongside this, we aim to provide children with opportunities to broaden their knowledge and experiences of Art and Design by learning about styles, techniques and famous artists.

Implementation:

Across School, our Art and Design curriculum is taught through a three-stage process we call ‘the creative process’. This is taught as follows:

1. Exploring and Developing
In this stage, children are given opportunities to explore and discuss the work of other artists and find out more about them or the artistic period. Children collect ideas/research the topic and showcase this in either individual or whole class theme board/collage. Children then explore initial ideas through drawing and sketching. This should take place even if the children are working in 2D or 3D for their final piece.
2. Investigating and Making
During this stage, children are given the opportunity to develop their ideas further and plan what they want to create. Children are encouraged to try out different techniques and to apply them to materials and processes. They then create their final piece of work – either individually or collaboratively – evaluating and adapting/changing as they go.
3. Evaluating and Developing Work
Children are given time to review what they have achieved, and the work of others, and comment on it saying what they think or feel about it. Children are given opportunities to identify what they might change about their final piece or the process they have been through and what they could do to improve and develop future work.

The skills taught within our Art and Design Curriculum are introduced in Early Years and Key Stage 1 and are then revisited at a higher degree of sophistication in Key Stage 2; this allows children to deepen their understanding and improve their skills throughout their time at XII Apostles.

In Key Stage 1, children are taught to use a wide variety of materials to help them creatively design products. Whilst doing this, the children will begin to develop their use of artistic technique such as: colour, texture, shape and space. The children will then be expected to begin using this vocabulary to compare the works of famous artists, craft makers and designers.

In Key Stage 2, the children have the opportunity to keep a sketch book in which they can keep plans, sketches and examples of the skills they will be using that year. The sketch books will also be used cross-curricular as a planning and observation tool. Throughout Key Stage 2, the children will continue to master the skills previously covered whilst using a wider variety of materials including pencil, charcoal, paint and clay.

Throughout their time at XII Apostles, children are able to work with different artists within school. During Year 5, the children visit Tattenhall as part of an art residential in which they are led by an inhouse artist over two days to produce collaborative artwork. Across school, children are given the chance to visit galleries and museums. This helps to support the children in learning about different artists while also providing them with opportunities to experience different forms of culture.

Impact:

At XII Apostles, we recognise the unique needs of each child and support them in reaching their human potential. The impact of our Art and Design curriculum is measured in the experiences, confidence and competence of our children within the subject. We ensure children receive the experiences they require, both within and beyond the curriculum, to develop their skills and become confident artists. Children learn about a variety of Artists, Designers and forms of visual art and are given an opportunity to revisit and improve these skills over their time in school.

Art and Design Long Term Plan.

Art and Design Policy.

Art class in 12 Apostles Primary
Music

Music - Subject Leader: Mr Rowlands

Intent

The national curriculum outlines the following aims for Music in schools:

  • Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • Learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Our Music curriculum intends to celebrate and recognise that each child is unique and encourages them to reach their full potential as Musicians. We look to help children become skilled, confident and creative Musicians. Alongside this, we aim to provide children with opportunities to broaden their knowledge and experiences of Music by learning about the concepts of: composition, notation, appreciation and performance.

Implementation

In Key Stage 1, children are taught to sing a wide repertory of songs regularly. These are appropriately selected for their year group. During this time, children are encouraged to listen to music and develop an awareness of different types of music. They are presented with opportunities to use both tuned and untuned instruments to create, experiment combine and explore them. During Early Years, children are first introduced to using claves to perform and compose. Throughout the Key Stage, children use these to develop their knowledge of rhythm, pulse and non-standard notation. In Key Stage 1, children begin to listen to and appreciate the compositions of famous composers.

In Key Stage 2, children are taught how to use a wide variety of instruments and are encouraged to appraise performances in a thoughtful and sensitive manner. They are taught to recognise and discriminate between various musical elements such as pitch and rhythm as well as recognising and writing scale notations. Throughout Key Stage 2, children continue to use the claves to an increasing degree of sophistication; this allows the to compose and record rhythms using standard notation. In Year 3, children are introduced to Ukuleles. Over their time in Key Stage 2, the children use the ukuleles to develop their knowledge of pitch, notation and to improve their performing skills. In Key Stage 2, children continue to learn about famous composers and use different instruments to help recreate elements of their work. Across school, staff are able to use various schemes to help support them in their planning. These schemes include: Singing Sherlock, Music Express, Chime, Inside Music, Sounds Topical and Sounds Practical.

Additional Opportunities

Over the course of their time at XII Apostles, children are given the opportunity to perform in whole class productions, visit theatres and performances at the Bridgewater Hall where the children watch the Halle Orchestra perform different classical and modern pieces. Not only do these experiences support the children’s curriculum learning about different composers, they also provide them with a chance to broaden their understanding of Music and the Performing Arts, visit different establishments and experience different forms of culture.

Small group and individual instrumental tuition is available (for children in years 3 to 6) at an additional cost. This tuition is provided by visiting tutors from the Wigan Music Service. This entitles children to attend Area Music Centres and take part in bands, orchestras and ensembles at no extra cost.

In Years 3-6, children are encouraged to join the school choir. During the school year, the children perform at different events including Young Voices, galas and other occasions supporting the local community. A school production is held at the end of each academic year. During this, the children in the choir are able to perform in front of both the children and the wider school community in a separate evening performance.

Impact:

At XII Apostles, we recognise the unique needs of each child and support them in reaching their human potential. The impact of our Music curriculum is measured in the experiences, confidence and competence of our children within the subject. We ensure children receive the experiences they require, both within and beyond the curriculum, to develop their skills and become confident Musicians. During their time at XII Apostles, Children learn about a variety of Musicians, composers and styles of Music and, throughout school, they are able to use the instruments and resources available to them to develop their skills and knowledge within different musical concepts.

Music Long Term Plan.

Music Policy.

Music trip and class at 12 Apostles Primary
Primary Languages - French

Subject Leader – Miss Ryan

Intent

French Policy - Download

The national curriculum for languages aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources
  • speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation
  • can write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt
  • discover and develop an appreciation of a range of writing in the language studied.

At Twelve Apostles, we believe that the learning of a language provides a valuable educational, social and cultural experience for our pupils. It helps them to develop communication skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing, with an aim of making good progress in one language. Furthermore, we believe that by developing our children’s knowledge of how a language works, we are preparing our children well for further language learning in the future. We also believe that learning another language gives children a new and broader perspective on the world, encouraging them to develop their understanding and respect for other cultures.

Implementation

Children begin to develop their love of language learning at the start of KS2 where they receive weekly sessions from Miss Ryan, French subject leader.

To deliver our language curriculum, we use a variety of resources and schemes, which are adapted to suit the needs of the particular children in our school. These include: Easy MFL (Iain Coleman), Early Start and BBC Primary French.

Details of topics covered in each year group are available on the curriculum area of our school website. Importantly, our children learn through active participation in games, rhymes, stories, song, grammar focus, video clips, sentence structure, and dictionary work and many other creative ways in order to extend and embed language skills.

Miss Ryan also leads a popular weekly “After-school French Club”

Impact

The impact of our MFL curriculum is that our children have an increased enjoyment and understanding of different cultures and languages. They develop language skills that will prepare them for further language learning in the future. They are aware of how learning a language is useful when travelling and possibly, for their future career choices. Progression through skills and vocabulary is evident through the year groups. Pupil interviews and scrutiny of children’s work, carried out by a member of the senior management tea, shows enjoyment of language learning and good progression of skills and vocabulary.

Picture of the children learning Primary Languages

YEAR 2 CHILDREN ENJOYING A FRENCH PICNIC

Primary Languages Long Term Plan.

PSHE

Personal, Social and Health Education; Subject Leader Mrs A. Nelson Pastoral Manager

Intent

Our school’s Mission Statement says: ‘Through Learning and Loving we will follow Jesus’

The first aim of our mission statement is to place Christ at the centre of everything we do. The gospel values of love, courage, tolerance, humility, thankfulness, responsibility and compassion are the foundations of our curriculum for personal, social and health education. Through our provision for PSHE we aim for the children to recognise and appreciate their own uniqueness and for them to fulfil their human potential. In order for every child to fulfil their potential we ensure they experience a broad and balanced PSHE curriculum that is accessible to all learners. Our PSHE curriculum enables the children to recognise the value in others and the importance of treating others with love and respect : Through learning and loving we follow Jesus. We encourage our children to play a positive role in contributing to the life of Twelve Apostles and the wider community. Our curriculum enables the children to recognise and respect the diversity within their immediate community and in the wider world. We teach our children about how society is organised and governed and their rights and responsibilities. Through these experiences the children learn to appreciate what it means to be a positive member of a diverse community.

Personal, social and health education (PSHE) enables children to become healthy, independent and responsible members of society. The umbrella of our curriculum for PSHE encompasses relationship and sex education RSE. RSE is delivered through the Catholic programme ‘Journey in Love.

Implementation

Our curriculum has been planned using the PSHE Association programme of study which provides a comprehensive programme that integrates the statutory content. This programme of study sets out learning opportunities across Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 based on three core themes.

Core Theme 1: Health and Wellbeing

Core Theme 2: Relationships

Core Theme 3: Living in the Wider World

The learning objectives within the core themes are taught using the SCARF resources and the RSE programme ‘A journey in Love’. The SCARF resources are organised into 5 units which are taught in each year group across Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2.

  • Me and my relationships
  • Valuing Differences
  • Keeping myself safe
  • Rights and responsibilities
  • Being my best
  • RSE is taught in each year group through the catholic programme ‘A journey in Love’

Impact

Our mission is clear, we aim for our children to become healthy, independent and responsible members of society.

PHSE Long Term Plan 2020-21

PHSE Curriculum Map 2020-21

PHSE Policy 2020-21

Picture of the children learning PSHE
Relationship and Sex Education (RSE)

Relationship and Sex Education

The Governors at XII Apostles RCPS have adopted the 'Journey in Love' programme to support the non statutory Relationships and Sex Education in a Christian context. This will be introduced in the 2017-18 academic year and will taught in all year groups. It will replace the current scheme taught in year 5 and 6 ‘All that I am ‘.

The programme is authentic to the teaching of the Catholic Church and is intended to support teachers and parents in Catholic schools to enable the holistic growth of children. We acknowledge that parents and carers are the key persons for children learning about sex and relationships, the foremost educators. Our programme should complement their role in nurturing their children’s human wholeness.

As part of our commitment to you, we will hold a meeting annually for the parents and carers of children in Years 5 and 6 to discuss the programme's contents. You have the right to withdraw your child from this aspect of the curriculum however, this is not to be confused with curriculum Science which is statutory.

The Secretary of State for Education confirms the Government’s ambition to support all young people to stay safe and prepare for life in modern Britain by making Relationships Education (Primary), Relationships and Sex Education (RSE - Secondary) and, subject to the outcome of a thorough consideration of the subject, Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE - both) statutory in all schools. The government laid an amendment1 to the Children and Social Work Bill on 1 March 2017 which they iintend to come into effect from September 2019 Relationship and Sex Education Policy Statement

A Journey in Love ; A brief outline of the programme

A Journey in Love has as its foundational premise in the belief that we are made in the image and likeness of God and, as a consequence, gender and sexuality are God’s gift, reflect God’s beauty and share in the divine creativity.

In order that children may grow and develop healthily and holistically towards an understanding of their gender and its implications for successful relationships, they must be at ease with themselves and grow in self- knowledge.

  • YR: God loves each of us in our uniqueness
  • Y1: We meet God’s love in our family
  • Y2: We meet God’s love in the community
  • Y3: How we live in love
  • Y4: God loves us in our differences
  • Y5: God loves me in my changing and development
  • Y6: The wonder of God’s love in creating new life

‘Love is the light – and in the end, the only light – that can always illuminate a world grown dim and give us the courage needed to keep living and working. Love is possible, and we are able to practise it because we are created in the image of God.’ Deus Caritas Est 39

Assesment

Class teachers are responsible for the assessment and recording of achievement of their children in line with the schools’ policy on Assessment.

In the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), children will be assessed against statements in the EYFS profile on entry to the Reception class and summatively at the end of the Reception year. Please see link below for more information about the EYFS profile.

In line with the expectations of the National Curriculum, children will be summatively assessed at the end of each year against the objectives for that year group. At the end of Key Stage 1/Y2, the children will complete Standardised Assessment Tests (SATs). The results of these, along with the teacher’s assessments, will be used to judge whether the children have met the age related expectations, are working towards them or are working at greater depth in Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Please see link below for more information about the age related expectations and assessment processes at the end of Key Stage 1.

At the end of Key Stage 2/Y6, the children will also sit the Standard Assessment Tests in Reading, SPaG (spelling, punctuation and grammar) and Mathematics. The results of these will be used to judge whether the children have met the age related expectations for that key stage, are working towards them or are working at greater depth. These tests are externally marked.

Children’s attainment in writing will be judged by the teacher using the children’s written work across the curriculum, in line with the interim assessment framework. Teacher’s assessment judgements are moderated internally and within external cluster groups to ensure consistency and accuracy.

Please see the link below for more information about Key Stage 2 assessments.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/534658/Information_for_parents_-_2016_NCT_results_at_the_end_of_key_stage_2.pdf

Extra-Curricular Activities

We have many after school sporting activities including football, rugby, cricket, badminton, table tennis and netball .Many of these are seasonal . There is also a French Club, a Choir and an Eco Club.Also there is a Cookery club and storybook sports for key stage 1. Children who are interested in music can take lessons in a variety of instruments. This year we have had children learning to play the keyboard, the guitar and the violin and brass instruments. Each year, several musical plays or concerts are produced and these provide great fun for both children and parents.